Information, education, and training

Another major activity of an OSCE mission is to provide information, education, and training to government officials and NGOs. This is often achieved in the form of seminars on:

  • human rights
  • rule of law
  • democratic process
  • freedom of the media
  • other aspects of international norms and codes about humanitarian issues
  • police practices in a democratic society
  • civilian control of the military

In most societies where OSCE missions are stationed, there may be little or no historical experience with democratic process among government officials or individual citizens. Therefore, there is an immense need in these societies for basic education about the fundamental principles of modern democratic processes and values. OSCE missions can be very effective in introducing such information at the local level.

Example
The OSCE-founded Kosovo Police Service School in Vustrri/Vucitrn provides democratically oriented police training for locally recruited cadets. Officer Agim Melenica, a KPS officer, teaches a class. (Lubomir Kotek/OSCE)

The OSCE-founded Kosovo Police Service School in Vustrri/Vucitrn provides democratically oriented police training for locally recruited cadets. Officer Agim Melenica, a KPS officer, teaches a class. (OSCE/Lubomir Kotek)

One method used in the OSCE region is training police enforcement in the procedures for enforcing human rights principles. The OSCE Mission in Kosovo, together with the Kosovo police and ministries of labor and social welfare, internal affairs and of justice, is conducting a series of 11 training sessions for 330 border police and 33 customs officers. The sessions focus on how to effectively identify and refer foreign and local victims of trafficking to relevant institutions such as the anti- trafficking section of the Kosovo Police Service, social workers, and victim advocates from the ministry of justice. This initiative, which began in May 2010, was based on an analysis by the OSCE Mission to Kosovo that found that the Kosovo Police needed a better understanding of the differences between trafficking in human beings, prostitution, and smuggling, in addition to the relevant laws and proper procedures in Kosovo.