OSCE Mission to Georgia

An CSCE mission was established in Georgia in November 1992. Its mandate involved:

  • Securing peace
  • Promoting practical co-operation between the conflict parties
  • Resolving the status of South Ossetia
  • Providing humanitarian and other aid
  • Coordinating international contacts for South Ossetia
Human rights monitoring and reporting training for Georgian NGOs, May 2002. (OSCE)

Human rights monitoring and reporting training for Georgian NGOs, May 2002. (OSCE)

After the situation became more stable, the OSCE Mission mandate was expanded to:

  • Support the UN mission in Abkhazia
  • Promote human rights and fundamental freedoms
  • Assist in the development of legal and democratic institutions and processes, including the provision of advice on the elaboration of anew constitution, the implementation of legislation on citizenship, the establishment of an independent judiciary, and election monitoring 
Seminars and advice

In 1995, the OSCE Mission organized seminars on the rule of law and capacity-building for human rights NGOs. The OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights conducted a needs and assessment mission in Georgia with other international organizations in order to provide technical assistance in Georgia. Together with the Georgian Parliament, the OSCE established and managed the Centre for Parliamentary Reform, which coordinated donor activities and provided strategic advice to the parliamentary leadership. Furthermore, the OSCE helped developing a national association of local councils. The OSCE also supported the development of professional skills of regional independent broadcast media.

When the Georgian justice ministry gave consideration to amending the constitution in 2004, the OSCE Mission provided expert advice. The Mission also worked to strengthen the rule of law by promoting reform of the legalsystem. 

Head of Mission Roy Reeve and Chairperson of the Georgian Parliament Nino Burjanadze at the signing of the Parliament's Code of Conduct, 12 October 2004. The Mission supported the development of the Code in response to calls from Georgia's Parliament.(OSCE/Dimitry Chikvaidze)

Head of Mission Roy Reeve and Chairperson of the Georgian Parliament Nino Burjanadze at the signing of the Parliament's Code of Conduct, 12 October 2004. The Mission supported the development of the Code in response to calls from Georgia's Parliament.(OSCE/Dimitry Chikvaidze)

In 2004, as part of its South Ossetia mandate, the OSCE Mission advanced a ceasefire and demilitarization proposal.

Election observation
Election officials counting ballots in the village of Sagvichio during Georgian parliamentary elections, 2 November 2003.(OSCE/Lubomir Kotek)

Election officials counting ballots in the village of Sagvichio during Georgian parliamentary elections, 2 November 2003.(OSCE/Lubomir Kotek)

The OSCE election observation mission deployed in November 2003 was one of the organization’s largest and longest election observation missions up to that time. Its assessment that the elections were characterized by systematic and widespread fraud substantially contributed to the massive popular protests against the government, which led to President Shevardnadze’s resignation.

Mission closed

Following the 2008 Russia-Georgia War, Russia refused to accept any linkage between OSCE activities in South Ossetia and those in the rest of Georgia in the renewal of the Mission mandate. Russia insisted that recognition of the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia be included in the future structure of the mission, which was rejected by Georgia and most participating states. Russia blocked renewal of the Mission mandate, and the Mission was closed at the end of the year.